Brand New God

ARTIST
Dominic Sansone | United States

TYPE
Sculpture

STYLE
Figurative

DIMENSIONS (in)
Variable

SHIPPING

Ships from United States 

    Art Description: Sixty figures supplicating themselves to a golden assault rifle. This piece explores our society's infatuation with violence and the cultural myths of firearms. Accolades and controversy have followed this work across the country. It is an award winning sculpture from the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan where judges Deb Mankoff and Shelli Weisberg wrote, "It reflects the ’heart of liberty’ - social action and social justice. Repetitive molds of faceless, distorted figures of people of all colors and races put into an ordered pattern suggests conformity and an inability to recognize choice or individual action separate from the collective masses which often threatens humanity.” It is also a piece that was censored from an exhibition in Kentucky, causing me to cancel a solo exhibition two years into planning. "Brand New God" has also appeared in the independent film "Burning Folk".


    Medium Used: Oil-painted cast urethane plastic figures and a gold-leafed replica AK-47


    Dominic Sansone | United States

    My current body of artwork is a critical response to the current geopolitical landscape, created by the disproportionate role of the Military Industrial Complex in our society. Militarism has seeped into every segment of our culture; from building “defensive” walls on our borders, to calls for arming our teachers and children. Fear and paranoia ooze from our pores as we cower in imaginary foxholes on battlefields that do not exist. Always a new enemy, always some new evil to vanquish, war without end. Ultimately the goal is not to answer the questions or propose solutions for the viewer, but hopefully to cause them to consider, with more than a cursory glance, the reality we build for ourselves through the choices we make as individuals and how those choices impact our civilization. To achieve these ends, I interpret contemporary events by drawing inspiration from moments in history and utilizing a multi-disciplinary approach with a dash of acerbic wit.

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